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Powell Homes Blog

Going Up! (When You Can’t Go Out):2-story homes in Seattle

Posted by Brooks Powell on Mar 11, 2017 5:30:00 AM

Going-Up-When-You-Can’t-Go-Out-_2-story-homes-in-Seattle_-_Copy.jpgThe Seattle area is a great place to live, but there are some unique challenges to building a home here. One of those challenges is finding the right lot on which to build your new home.

According to quora.com, land prices for a new home generally should start out at about 33.3 percent of the total cost. However, they go on to explain that, “when the ‘highest and best use’ of the land under your house becomes a new house on it, the land value can increase to 90% to 99% land.” Of course Quora is talking about national figures, but then they single out the Seattle area as an example.

Most of the Seattle Area as re-built after a massive fire in about 1900 was built out as small bungalow type detached houses with a small main floor footprint of about 800 sf. Even though people have finished out basement space and/or attic space to increase the "living sf" of the home, the 800 sf footprint of the foundation and structure lead to the house becoming obsolete on land that has greatly appreciated over time.

Granted, not every new home built in Seattle will be built on a lot that small. But there’s no denying that increasing land prices have impacted new home costs. So if you’re in a position where you want to build a new home of adequate size for your family (now and into the future), how can you do that without spending a fortune on the property?

One solution is to go up when you can’t go out. Just because you don’t have a larger lot doesn’t mean you have to settle for an 800 square foot home. A 2-story home can provide you with the space you need—even on a smaller lot.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about. The floor plan for this 3-Bedroom Seattle home provides 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, and a half-bath in its 1,842 square feet of space (click here for a larger view of the floor plans).

Going_Up2_-_Copy.jpgThe main level offers a garage (with entrance to the home), a Pocket Den, entry space with bench, a powder room, and an open-plan Kitchen, Dining Room, and Family Room on the main level. There’s even a covered porch on one end of the home and a covered patio on the opposite end.

 

 

 

 

 

Going_Up3_-_Copy.jpgThe second floor offers a Master Bedroom (with walk-in closet) and bath, plus three additional bedrooms (one could be a bonus room or a home office), an extra full bath, and a laundry room.

That configuration provides you with a lot of livable space and yet keeps a very small footprint. Of course this is just one example of how new Seattle-area homeowners can go up instead of out when building their homes. You can look at a different configuration in this 4-bedroom, 1.874 square foot home in SeaTac or check any number of our other 2-story options here.

The point is, you don’t always have to spread out to get the space you want inside your new Seattle-area home.

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Topics: Seattle homebuilder, floor plans that let you go up instead of out, 2-story Seattle homes